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John Baez replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
Yes - though those are 'classical', not 'quantum', they'd typically be lumped under 'fluid mechanics' rather than 'classical mechanics'.
Mathias Völlinger replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
+John Baez OK, and there are the Navier–Stokes equations, too.
Kram Einsnulldreizwei replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
+Mathias Völlinger appropriate tools for the right applications.
Perhaps one of the hardest parts of physics is the physics of large systems. Thermodynamics. Especially the non-equilibrium case. But all parts of physics have limits that are constantly pushed.
John Baez replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
+Mathias Völlinger - I'm not sure about that - for example, trying to use quantum mechanics or quantum field theory to understand liquid water or an atomic nucleus in detail is extremely hard.  But classical mechanics sure provides plenty of complex systems, visible at the macroscopic scale!
Mathias Völlinger replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
Classical mechanics seems to be the most "complicated" part of physics.
John Baez replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
+James Lamb - yes, it's good to note that the tidal forces imposed by the Moon on the Earth are tiny compared to those imposed the other way!  Those other tidal forces were enough to lock the Moon so that one face always faces us. 
James Lamb replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
Ah - thanks for more refined definition - I extrapolated the meaning from earthly tides, wrought by the sun and our moon and moderated by currents.
John Baez replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (3 days ago)
+James Lamb - When I said a moon too close to Saturn would be broken up by 'tidal forces', I meant the forces caused by Saturn.  A tidal force arises whenever the near side of an object feels a stronger gravitational pull than the far side; this tends to stretch that object. 
James Lamb replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (4 days ago)
I was going to ask about the tidal forces, but I looked Saturn up to see there are a lot of moons!
Harold Overton replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (4 days ago)
+John Baez My observation: Mathematicians claim to be able to Contrive NEW DESCRIPTIONS, and that Physicists will find Phenomena that "Fit", while History seems to exhibit the Reverse- most of the time!
John Baez replied RE: Saturn’s F ring and shepherd satellites a natural outcome of satellite system formation (4 days ago)
+Harold Overton - I think that's pretty common.   Even when we know the relevant laws, complex phenomena take a lot of work to understand.