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Recent Activity on SelectedPapers.net

Jacob Biamonte replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (3 days ago)
About 'reconcile' it's accurate, if you think, maybe sensational :)
Snehal Shekatkar replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (3 days ago)
+Jacob Biamonte I see. Thanks for this information. I will try to keep in touch with you. :)
Jacob Biamonte replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (3 days ago)
+Snehal Shekatkar that's cool, but I won't be around at that time.  +Mauro Faccin might be however.  His email is his first name dot his last name at isi.it
Snehal Shekatkar replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (3 days ago)
+Jacob Biamonte​ I would like to comment on the word "reconcile" that you use use in your posts about this topic. In my opinion that word is used when ideas contradict with each other (like quantum mechanics and general relativity). I don't think that quantum mechanics and complex networks' theory contradict each other and so the word reconcile may not be appropriate in this context. Any comment?
Snehal Shekatkar replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (3 days ago)
+Jacob Biamonte​ Hmm.. Perhaps in September of this year I am coming to Italy for a school on Complex networks. School is organized by Alex Arenas. Are you going to be there?
Jacob Biamonte replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (4 days ago)
That's cool +Snehal Shekatkar --- yes, +Mauro Faccin  and myself have started a review that we're going to try to get +John Baez into.  We've been waiting to show him until the book was sent to the publishers. 
Snehal Shekatkar replied RE: Chiral Quantum Walks (4 days ago)
I did not know at all about something like this though I am already working for few years in this area. I will look into it. Has any review been written about this topic?
Alexander Fretheim replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (5 days ago)
+michael greene Personally I enjoy the conspiracy theories. They can be very entertaining. The reptillians one is hilarious! :D
michael greene replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (5 days ago)
+John Baez you would win that bet.
John Baez replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (6 days ago)
I don't know what a Nibiru-proponent is, and I bet I'm happier not knowing.
Jouni Pohjola replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (6 days ago)
Should we place bets on how many Nibiru-proponents understand or care about the "any comets that may have been shaken loose won't arrive in more than a million years" part now that their pet woobery has been "validated by science"?
John Baez replied RE: Water Trapping on Tidally Locked Terrestrial Planets Requires Special Conditions (6 days ago)
+Isaac Kuo - cool!  So is game design a profession for you, or is that also a hobby?  (Okay, I guess it's time for me to look at your profile to see what you do for a living.)

You might enjoy some of the conversation we're having here:

https://johncarlosbaez.wordpress.com/2015/02/14/earth-like-planets-near-red-dwarfs/

and I bet you could shed light on the issue of relativistic interstellar travel.
John Baez replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (6 days ago)
+Alexander Fretheim - I keep track of important dates using my timeline:

http://math.ucr.edu/home/baez/timeline.html

Homo sapiens is about 250,000 years old.
Alexander Fretheim replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (6 days ago)
+michael greene Just looked it up - you're right. Don't know what I was remembering.
michael greene replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (6 days ago)
+Alexander Fretheim. My memory has Homo Sapiens emerging some 200,000 years ago. There are times when my joints are creaky that I feel I was among them.
Kram Einsnulldreizwei replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (Feb. 19, 2015)
+Alexander Fretheim yeah, I know that Stonehenge is quite a bit younger than that. It'd be an alternate history though.
I guess it's quite a stretch...
Alexander Fretheim replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (Feb. 19, 2015)
+Kram Einsnulldreizwei Stonehenge is only 6000 years old. 70,000 years ago Homo Sapiens didn't even exist yet - that would still be in the era of Homo Erectus.
Kram Einsnulldreizwei replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (Feb. 19, 2015)
Could make for an interesting alternate-history story: Generations upon generations, people passed on the legend of the light in the sky which steadily approached Earth. It's the sole reason why they started to build structures like the Stonehenge. Cultures all around the world independently built structures properly aligned with the stars to observe the curious path of what must have been a powerful spirit.
(Just either bump up the brightness or the proximity of said objects and ponder what changes that could have made, likely mostly on the mythology side of things, and how people alternatively interpreted this as a bad omen, leaving the place they are in or as a sign of prosperity, staying put, and how that may have changed history in dramatic ways by moving early population in different ways)

In either case, it's a neat thought. Makes you wonder what other close-by objects just were near misses a couple millenia ago.
Alexander Fretheim replied RE: The Closest Known Flyby of a Star to the Solar System (Feb. 19, 2015)
Maybe that's how we'll finally get beyond the solar system - hitch a ride on a runaway star!